Review: If We Could Speak Like Wolves, by Kim Moore

Heres a fine and finely-written review in the ezine, Litter of Kim Moores recent, prize-winning pamphlet, If We Could Speak Like Wolves. She has, I think, a musicians ear. Probably two, notes C J Allen, dryly and with perfect pitch.

Originally from Leicester and now very much at home in Barrow-in-Furness, Moores star is on the rise and its light will brighten up your bookshelf. Read more>>

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Review: The Other Side Of The Bridge by Geraldine Green

Geraldine Green is Barrow born and Barrow bred, and now lives down the road in Ulverston. Many of her poems are deeply rooted in that neck of the woods but have crossed the Atlantic easily, where poet and critic Djelloul Marbrook is enjoying their unerring musicality.

The Other Side of the Bridge is not long out from Indigo Dreams read the review>>

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Review: The Pinecone by Jenny Uglow

The village of Wreay, a few miles south of Carlisle, is home to one of the most remarkable of Victorian buildings, St Marys Church. In The Pinecone, Jenny Uglow tells the story of its equally remarkable creator Sarah Losh, described by Simon Jenkins in Englands 1000 Best Churches as an individual genius, a Charlotte Bronte of wood and stone.

Top marks to The Guardian for being the first to review this intimate, lavish life of a visionary architect. Read Rachel Hewitts review and remember that Jenny Uglow will be talking about her book in St Marys Church on 22 September.

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Review: The Waiting Hillside by Martin Malone

Carolyn Richardson is mightily impressed by Martin Malones first full-length collection of poems, beautifully published and produced by Templar Poetry and highly praised by Carol Ann Duffy and Simon Armitage, no less.

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Review: Onions and Other Intentions by Maggie Norton

We spotted this review in the Maryport-based little mag The Journal, and asked very nicely for permission to use it. Permission granted, so thank you very much to Journal editor Sam Smith and one of his regular reviewers, Emma Lee, running the rule over Ulverston poet Maggie Nortons latest.

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Review: Peter Loneys Peninsula

If you are at all interested in poetry, in poetry and thought, in poetry as thought, Loneys Peninsula has to be on your reading list. It surely cant be long before it has the full and widespread recognition and admiration it deserves.

If you are at all interested in why Terry Jones is so impressed, read more>>

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Reviews: Furious Resonance

Our latest reviews recall the old joke about buses you wait for ages and then two turn up at once. By pure coincidence, wed asked Martin Malone to give us his thoughts on Terry Joness shockingly pink pamphlet when John North turned up with his, so heres two for the price of one.

Compare and contrast>>

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Review: A Division of the Light

Kathleen Jones reviews Whitehaven writer Christopher Burns first novel since 1996. Whilst she thinks its exquisitely written a masterclass in understated narrative, Ms Jones is nevertheless left longing for a bit of passion.

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Review: Not Saying Goodbye at Gate 21

New Zealand writer Tim Jones has kindly allowed us to reproduce his review of Cumbrian poet Kathleen Jones recently published collection, Not Saying Goodbye at Gate 21.

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