The Language of Footprints

Cumbrian writer Ian Hills submission to Lancaster Litfest for a special publication of new work inspired by Lancashire landscapes is one of three pieces that make up The Language of Footprints, the latest ebook from the festivals Flax imprint.

Instar explores and celebrates the liminal landscape of Leighton Moss and Morecambe Bay, where land and water continually change places and struggle for dominance. Read more>>

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Jacob Polley makes T S Eliot Prize shortlist

Cumbrian poet Jacob Polley is one of ten poets shortlisted for what Andrew Motion once called the prize most poets want to win. Polley is in the frame for his latest collection, The Havocs, due to be published by Picador on 8 November.

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Wake up call to Kingsnorth readers

Ulverston writer Paul Kingsnorth is aiming to publish his first novel, The Wake, through the revolutionary reader-funded publishing outfit Unbound. Set in the three years after the battle of Hastings, The Wake will tell the story of a fractured band of guerrilla fighters who take up arms against the Norman invaders.

If you like the idea of the book the authors pitch you pays your money and you takes your chance. Paul has 35% of the pledges he needs for the book to happen. Have your credit card handy and find out more>>

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Writing on the Greta

This is the book that deep down I always wanted to write, says Keith Richardson at the beginning of the foreword to his latest book, The Greta. Its a labour of love and a hymn of praise to the greatest little river in the world, lavishly illustrated with superb photographs by Keiths longtime collaborator Val Corbett.

The pair launch the book at the Theatre by the Lake on Sunday, and you can read the rest of the foreword here>>

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Review: If We Could Speak Like Wolves, by Kim Moore

Heres a fine and finely-written review in the ezine, Litter of Kim Moores recent, prize-winning pamphlet, If We Could Speak Like Wolves. She has, I think, a musicians ear. Probably two, notes C J Allen, dryly and with perfect pitch.

Originally from Leicester and now very much at home in Barrow-in-Furness, Moores star is on the rise and its light will brighten up your bookshelf. Read more>>

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Review: The Other Side Of The Bridge by Geraldine Green

Geraldine Green is Barrow born and Barrow bred, and now lives down the road in Ulverston. Many of her poems are deeply rooted in that neck of the woods but have crossed the Atlantic easily, where poet and critic Djelloul Marbrook is enjoying their unerring musicality.

The Other Side of the Bridge is not long out from Indigo Dreams read the review>>

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Review: The Pinecone by Jenny Uglow

The village of Wreay, a few miles south of Carlisle, is home to one of the most remarkable of Victorian buildings, St Marys Church. In The Pinecone, Jenny Uglow tells the story of its equally remarkable creator Sarah Losh, described by Simon Jenkins in Englands 1000 Best Churches as an individual genius, a Charlotte Bronte of wood and stone.

Top marks to The Guardian for being the first to review this intimate, lavish life of a visionary architect. Read Rachel Hewitts review and remember that Jenny Uglow will be talking about her book in St Marys Church on 22 September.

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Civilisation and its Discontents an interview with Paul Kingsnorth

Just before going into event organiser mode to add the finishing touches to his beloved Dark Mountain Festival (17-19 August, only a few tickets left) Ulverston writer Paul Kingsnorth discussed his five desert island books with The Browser website, contributing to their excellent FiveBooks series.

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Nocturnes at Nohant Helen Farish plays Chopin

Cumbrian poet Helen Farish talks about her new collection of poems about the love affair between Frederick Chopin and the novelist George Sand, in an interview first published on The Poetry Schools website and re-produced here with their kind permission.

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Review: The Waiting Hillside by Martin Malone

Carolyn Richardson is mightily impressed by Martin Malones first full-length collection of poems, beautifully published and produced by Templar Poetry and highly praised by Carol Ann Duffy and Simon Armitage, no less.

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Storyteller turns story writer

A fellow storyteller once commented, when Taffy goes it will be like a library burning down. Which is maybe why storyteller Taffy Thomas has decided to publish a collection of Cumbrian folk tales that hes been finding and learning for two decades. The book is published by The History Press on 4 July and will be launched at a special event at Bookcase in Carlisle.

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Lakeland Book of the Year Awards 2012 shortlist announced

Unbelievably, the Lakeland Book of the Year Awards are now in their 28th year. This time round, fifty-five books were entered and the judges author and columnist Hunter Davies (pictured), broadcaster and writer Eric Robson, and BBC News presenter Fiona Armstrong have spent the spring months pouring over them.

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Review: Onions and Other Intentions by Maggie Norton

We spotted this review in the Maryport-based little mag The Journal, and asked very nicely for permission to use it. Permission granted, so thank you very much to Journal editor Sam Smith and one of his regular reviewers, Emma Lee, running the rule over Ulverston poet Maggie Nortons latest.

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