Whats On Calendar

A comprehensive guide to literature events in Cumbria and a little further afield.

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Posterboard

  1. Nov
    28
    Wednesday: 2:00 pm 3:15 pm


    Historical novelist Deborah Swift talks about her new novel, The Gilded Lily.

    Its winter, 1661. Sadie Appleby has never left rural Westmorland. But one night she is woken by her sister, Ella. She has robbed her employer and is on the run. Together the girls flee for London. But the dead mans relatives are in pursuit, and soon a game of cat and mouse ensues among st the freezing warren that is London in winter.

    Ella is soon seduced by the glitter and glamour of city life and sets her sights on the flamboyant man-about-town, Jay Whitgift, owner of a beauty parlour for the wives of the London gentry. But nothing in the capital is what it seems, least of all Jay Whitgift. Soon a rift has formed between Ella and Sadie, and the sisters are threatened by a menace more sinister than even the law.

    Set in a brilliantly realised Restoration London, The Gilded Lily is a novel about beauty and desire, about the stories we tell ourselves, and about how sisterhood can be both a burden and a saving grace.

    Deborah Swifts The Gilded Lily is a heart-rending story of two sisters on the run, searching for a better life. Beautifully written and meticulously researched, the novel drew me straight into the teeming streets of Restoration London. An addictive, page-turning read. Mary Sharratt

    Deborah Swift worked in the theatre and at the BBC, as a set and costume designer, before studying for an MA in Creative Writing in 2007. She lives in North Lancashire. Her first novel, The Ladys Slipper, was hailed as A sumptuous debut from a wonderful new voice in historical fiction.

    Other dates on Deborah Swifts author tour of Cumbrian libraries:

    * Wednesday 5 December, Cockermouth Library, 2.00pm
    * Tuesday 11 December, Windermere Library, 2.00pm

    Categories:
    Fiction
  2. Dec
    1
    Saturday: 3:00 pm 4:30 pm


    On the bicentenary of the deaths of two of William and Mary Wordsworths children a look at the impact of these tragedies on the family.

    Muriel Strachan, who is researching a book on Wordsworths children, will speak about Catherine and Thomas. Cameron Butland, Rector of Grasmere, will read letters about the events of 1812, illustrating how the family coped with these two very different deaths, and leading into questions and an open discussion. It is easy to think that, in an age when child mortality was more common, sudden deaths did not affect parents as much as now.

    The well documented story of Catherine and Thomas Wordsworth show this to be untrue and offers insights to all those who have experienced the loss of a child.



    Categories:
    Talks & Lectures
  3. Dec
    4
    Tuesday: 6:30 pm 9:00 pm


    Taffy Thomas and friends have been hosting this session in the lounge bar at the Watermill Inn at Ings (near Windermere) for over 10 years now. Taffy was Britains first Storytelling Laureate and his repertoire extends to more than 300 stories, tales and elaborate lies, collected mainly from traditional oral sources, which he is happy to tell in almost any situation.

    Categories:
    Storytelling
  4. Dec
    5
    Wednesday: 2:00 pm 3:15 pm


    Historical novelist Deborah Swift talks about her new novel, The Gilded Lily.

    Its winter, 1661. Sadie Appleby has never left rural Westmorland. But one night she is woken by her sister, Ella. She has robbed her employer and is on the run. Together the girls flee for London. But the dead mans relatives are in pursuit, and soon a game of cat and mouse ensues amongst the freezing warren that is London in winter.

    Ella is soon seduced by the glitter and glamour of city life and sets her sights on the flamboyant man-about-town, Jay Whitgift, owner of a beauty parlour for the wives of the London gentry. But nothing in the capital is what it seems, least of all Jay Whitgift. Soon a rift has formed between Ella and Sadie, and the sisters are threatened by a menace more sinister than even the law.

    Set in a brilliantly realised Restoration London, The Gilded Lily is a novel about beauty and desire, about the stories we tell ourselves, and about how sisterhood can be both a burden and a saving grace.

    Deborah Swifts The Gilded Lily is a heart-rending story of two sisters on the run, searching for a better life. Beautifully written and meticulously researched, the novel drew me straight into the teeming streets of Restoration London. An addictive, page-turning read. Mary Sharratt

    Deborah Swift worked in the theatre and at the BBC, as a set and costume designer, before studying for an MA in Creative Writing in 2007. She lives in North Lancashire. Her first novel, The Ladys Slipper, was hailed as A sumptuous debut from a wonderful new voice in historical fiction.

    Other dates on Deborah Swifts author tour of Cumbrian libraries:

    * Tuesday 11 December, Windermere Library, 2.00pm

    Categories:
    Fiction
  5. Dec
    11
    Tuesday: 2:00 pm 3:15 pm


    Historical novelist Deborah Swift talks about her new novel, The Gilded Lily.

    Its winter, 1661. Sadie Appleby has never left rural Westmorland. But one night she is woken by her sister, Ella. She has robbed her employer and is on the run. Together the girls flee for London. But the dead mans relatives are in pursuit, and soon a game of cat and mouse ensues amongst the freezing warren that is London in winter.

    Ella is soon seduced by the glitter and glamour of city life and sets her sights on the flamboyant man-about-town, Jay Whitgift, owner of a beauty parlour for the wives of the London gentry. But nothing in the capital is what it seems, least of all Jay Whitgift. Soon a rift has formed between Ella and Sadie, and the sisters are threatened by a menace more sinister than even the law.

    Set in a brilliantly realised Restoration London, The Gilded Lily is a novel about beauty and desire, about the stories we tell ourselves, and about how sisterhood can be both a burden and a saving grace.

    Deborah Swifts The Gilded Lily is a heart-rending story of two sisters on the run, searching for a better life. Beautifully written and meticulously researched, the novel drew me straight into the teeming streets of Restoration London. An addictive, page-turning read. Mary Sharratt

    Deborah Swift worked in the theatre and at the BBC, as a set and costume designer, before studying for an MA in Creative Writing in 2007. She lives in North Lancashire. Her first novel, The Ladys Slipper, was hailed as A sumptuous debut from a wonderful new voice in historical fiction.

    Other dates on Deborah Swifts author tour of Cumbrian libraries:

    Categories:
    Fiction
  6. Dec
    11
    Tuesday: 2:00 pm 3:00 pm


    Join the Wordsworth Trusts Education Officer, Catherine Kay, to read and discuss three of Shelleys best-loved poems.

    Looking at his approach to some of the great Romantic themes, Catherine will explore Ozymandias, Ode to the West Wind and extracts from The Masque of Anarchy in a relaxed and informal atmosphere.

    My name is Ozymandias, King of Kings;
    Look on my Works, ye Mighty, and despair!

    Categories:
    Reading Groups
  7. Dec
    12
    Wednesday: 2:15 pm 4:00 pm


    In a series of classes, Pamela Woof will discuss and explore some of the most celebrated passages of prose and poetry in English Literature.

    Dorothy Wordsworth and her brother are a unique literary phenomenon. How do we account for similarities? For differences? Did these arise out of conversation, out of an extraordinary imaginative sympathy, or out of sheer imitation?

    You are welcome to attend occasional sessions, and no previous reading is required.

    The classes will be led by Pamela Woof, FRSL, President of the Wordsworth Trust, and editor of Dorothy Wordsworth: The Grasmere and Alfoxden Journals. Pamela has written widely on poetry and prose of the Romantic period.

    Further classes take place on 9 January, 13 February, and 13 March.

    Categories:
    Workshop / course
  8. Dec
    15
    Saturday: 11:00 am 12:00 pm

    The Southey Familys Cabinet of Curiosities, now in the Wordsworth Trusts collection, is a remarkable piece of furniture, with six drawers filled with treasures and ephemera collected from the early 19th century onwards.

    Furniture restorers Hugh Wright and Frank Wood, along with expert Tony Lonton, discuss the secrets revealed during the restoration of the cabinet, including who made it, and how.



    Categories:
    Talks & Lectures
  9. Dec
    16
    Sunday: 5:00 pm 8:30 pm

    The troubled friendship and occasional rivalry between two of Englands greatest poets, Samuel Taylor Coleridge and William Wordsworth, is explored in an unorthodox light in this historical drama from renegade director Julian Temple, with a screenplay by Frank Cottrell Boyce.

    As Coleridge (Linus Roache), Wordsworth (John Hannah), and Lord Byron (Guy Lankester) await the news of who will be the new poet laureate in 1816, Coleridge finds himself thinking back to 1795, when he and Wordsworth were two struggling writers involved in radical politics. Embracing the ideal of an agrarian society, Coleridge moves to the country, accompanied by his wife Sarah (Samantha Morton) and their infant son. Wordsworth soon follows, joined by his often argumentative sister Dorothy (Emily Woof).

    However, the two writers discover the hard work of maintaining a farm is not as conducive to their literary endeavors as they might have imagined, despite taking most available opportunities to shock the local bourgeoisie. Its not until Coleridge discovers laudanum that he finds the inspiration to create his first masterpiece, The Rime of the Ancient Mariner.

    Wordsworth soon finds his friends fame is far surpassing his own, which brings an uncomfortable jealousy into their relationship; Coleridge, meanwhile, has developed a dangerous fondness for opium, which threatens to drown the creative spirit that it once sparked within him.

    A Wordsworth Trust film screening in conjunction with Thorney How Independent Hostel, with related discussions led by a member of the Wordsworth Trust staff.

    Its very silly, though quite watchable with some ripe over-acting from Emily Woof as Dorothy Wordsworth (in the role theyd have given Joan Sims if this was a Carry On movie.)

    Peter Bradshaw, The Guardian

    Categories: Film
  10. Dec
    19
    Wednesday: 7:30 pm 9:30 pm


    Carlisles monthly open mic night where the accent is on fiction with pieces of up to 1,000 words allowed but poets are also very welcome.

    Longer fiction may also be a possibility contact Mike Smith to discuss the ins and outs as might short plays and other dramatic writing.

    Other than in these special cases, sign up on the night if you want a slot.





  11. Dec
    21
    Friday: 8:00 pm 10:30 pm


    Lancasters monthly literary cabaret features poetry from Trevor Meaney (pictured), comedy from Ste Price, and many more to be announced. Compere is Simon Baker.

    The open mic session from 8.15pm-8.45pm offers six 5-minute spots open to anyone. As these are very popular you may want to email to book a spot in advance: [email protected].

    Open mic performers are admitted half-price. For more information, see www.spotlightlancaster.co.uk.

  12. Jan
    9
    Wednesday: 2:15 pm 4:00 pm


    In a series of classes, Pamela Woof will discuss and explore some of the most celebrated passages of prose and poetry in English Literature.

    Dorothy Wordsworth and her brother are a unique literary phenomenon. How do we account for similarities? For differences? Did these arise out of conversation, out of an extraordinary imaginative sympathy, or out of sheer imitation?

    You are welcome to attend occasional sessions, and no previous reading is required.

    The classes will be led by Pamela Woof, FRSL, President of the Wordsworth Trust, and editor of Dorothy Wordsworth: The Grasmere and Alfoxden Journals. Pamela has written widely on poetry and prose of the Romantic period.

    Further classes take place on 9 January, 13 February, and 13 March.

    Categories:
    Workshop / course
  13. Jan
    16
    Wednesday: 7:30 pm 9:30 pm


    Carlisles monthly open mic night where the accent is on fiction with pieces of up to 1,000 words allowed but poets are also very welcome.

    Longer fiction may also be a possibility contact Mike Smith to discuss the ins and outs as might short plays and other dramatic writing.

    Other than in these special cases, sign up on the night if you want a slot.





  14. Feb
    5
    Tuesday: 6:30 pm 9:00 pm


    Taffy Thomas and friends have been hosting this session in the lounge bar at the Watermill Inn at Ings (near Windermere) for over 10 years now. Taffy was Britains first Storytelling Laureate and his repertoire extends to more than 300 stories, tales and elaborate lies, collected mainly from traditional oral sources, which he is happy to tell in almost any situation.

    Categories:
    Storytelling
  15. Feb
    13
    Wednesday: 2:15 pm 4:00 pm


    In a series of classes, Pamela Woof will discuss and explore some of the most celebrated passages of prose and poetry in English Literature.

    Dorothy Wordsworth and her brother are a unique literary phenomenon. How do we account for similarities? For differences? Did these arise out of conversation, out of an extraordinary imaginative sympathy, or out of sheer imitation?

    You are welcome to attend occasional sessions, and no previous reading is required.

    The classes will be led by Pamela Woof, FRSL, President of the Wordsworth Trust, and editor of Dorothy Wordsworth: The Grasmere and Alfoxden Journals. Pamela has written widely on poetry and prose of the Romantic period.

    Further classes take place on 9 January, 13 February, and 13 March.

    Categories:
    Workshop / course
  16. Feb
    20
    Wednesday: 7:30 pm 9:30 pm


    Carlisles monthly open mic night where the accent is on fiction with pieces of up to 1,000 words allowed but poets are also very welcome.

    Longer fiction may also be a possibility contact Mike Smith to discuss the ins and outs as might short plays and other dramatic writing.

    Other than in these special cases, sign up on the night if you want a slot.





  17. Mar
    5
    Tuesday: 6:30 pm 9:00 pm


    Taffy Thomas and friends have been hosting this session in the lounge bar at the Watermill Inn at Ings (near Windermere) for over 10 years now. Taffy was Britains first Storytelling Laureate and his repertoire extends to more than 300 stories, tales and elaborate lies, collected mainly from traditional oral sources, which he is happy to tell in almost any situation.

    Categories:
    Storytelling
  18. Mar
    20
    Wednesday: 7:30 pm 9:30 pm


    Carlisles monthly open mic night where the accent is on fiction with pieces of up to 1,000 words allowed but poets are also very welcome.

    Longer fiction may also be a possibility contact Mike Smith to discuss the ins and outs as might short plays and other dramatic writing.

    Other than in these special cases, sign up on the night if you want a slot.





  19. Apr
    2
    Tuesday: 7:30 pm 10:00 pm


    Taffy Thomas and friends have been hosting this session in the lounge bar at the Watermill Inn at Ings (near Windermere) for over 10 years now. Taffy was Britains first Storytelling Laureate and his repertoire extends to more than 300 stories, tales and elaborate lies, collected mainly from traditional oral sources, which he is happy to tell in almost any situation.

    Categories:
    Storytelling
  20. Apr
    17
    Wednesday: 7:30 pm 9:30 pm


    Carlisles monthly open mic night where the accent is on fiction with pieces of up to 1,000 words allowed but poets are also very welcome.

    Longer fiction may also be a possibility contact Mike Smith to discuss the ins and outs as might short plays and other dramatic writing.

    Other than in these special cases, sign up on the night if you want a slot.





  21. May
    7
    Tuesday: 7:30 pm 10:00 pm


    Taffy Thomas and friends have been hosting this session in the lounge bar at the Watermill Inn at Ings (near Windermere) for over 10 years now. Taffy was Britains first Storytelling Laureate and his repertoire extends to more than 300 stories, tales and elaborate lies, collected mainly from traditional oral sources, which he is happy to tell in almost any situation.

    Categories:
    Storytelling
  22. May
    15
    Wednesday: 7:30 pm 9:30 pm


    Carlisles monthly open mic night where the accent is on fiction with pieces of up to 1,000 words allowed but poets are also very welcome.

    Longer fiction may also be a possibility contact Mike Smith to discuss the ins and outs as might short plays and other dramatic writing.

    Other than in these special cases, sign up on the night if you want a slot.





  23. Jun
    4
    Tuesday: 7:30 pm 10:00 pm


    Taffy Thomas and friends have been hosting this session in the lounge bar at the Watermill Inn at Ings (near Windermere) for over 10 years now. Taffy was Britains first Storytelling Laureate and his repertoire extends to more than 300 stories, tales and elaborate lies, collected mainly from traditional oral sources, which he is happy to tell in almost any situation.

    Categories:
    Storytelling
  24. Jun
    19
    Wednesday: 7:30 pm 9:30 pm


    Carlisles monthly open mic night where the accent is on fiction with pieces of up to 1,000 words allowed but poets are also very welcome.

    Longer fiction may also be a possibility contact Mike Smith to discuss the ins and outs as might short plays and other dramatic writing.

    Other than in these special cases, sign up on the night if you want a slot.





  25. Jul
    2
    Tuesday: 7:30 pm 10:00 pm


    Taffy Thomas and friends have been hosting this session in the lounge bar at the Watermill Inn at Ings (near Windermere) for over 10 years now. Taffy was Britains first Storytelling Laureate and his repertoire extends to more than 300 stories, tales and elaborate lies, collected mainly from traditional oral sources, which he is happy to tell in almost any situation.

    Categories:
    Storytelling
  26. Jul
    17
    Wednesday: 7:30 pm 9:30 pm


    Carlisles monthly open mic night where the accent is on fiction with pieces of up to 1,000 words allowed but poets are also very welcome.

    Longer fiction may also be a possibility contact Mike Smith to discuss the ins and outs as might short plays and other dramatic writing.

    Other than in these special cases, sign up on the night if you want a slot.





  27. Aug
    6
    Tuesday: 7:30 pm 10:00 pm


    Taffy Thomas and friends have been hosting this session in the lounge bar at the Watermill Inn at Ings (near Windermere) for over 10 years now. Taffy was Britains first Storytelling Laureate and his repertoire extends to more than 300 stories, tales and elaborate lies, collected mainly from traditional oral sources, which he is happy to tell in almost any situation.

    Categories:
    Storytelling
  28. Aug
    21
    Wednesday: 7:30 pm 9:30 pm


    Carlisles monthly open mic night where the accent is on fiction with pieces of up to 1,000 words allowed but poets are also very welcome.

    Longer fiction may also be a possibility contact Mike Smith to discuss the ins and outs as might short plays and other dramatic writing.

    Other than in these special cases, sign up on the night if you want a slot.





  29. Sep
    3
    Tuesday: 7:30 pm 10:00 pm


    Taffy Thomas and friends have been hosting this session in the lounge bar at the Watermill Inn at Ings (near Windermere) for over 10 years now. Taffy was Britains first Storytelling Laureate and his repertoire extends to more than 300 stories, tales and elaborate lies, collected mainly from traditional oral sources, which he is happy to tell in almost any situation.

    Categories:
    Storytelling
  30. Sep
    18
    Wednesday: 7:30 pm 9:30 pm


    Carlisles monthly open mic night where the accent is on fiction with pieces of up to 1,000 words allowed but poets are also very welcome.

    Longer fiction may also be a possibility contact Mike Smith to discuss the ins and outs as might short plays and other dramatic writing.

    Other than in these special cases, sign up on the night if you want a slot.





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